Sent: Wednesday, October 30, 2002 12:43 PM
Subject: Strategic Implications of Standards for Global Markets in services

Standards for trade in services  have   increasing strategic implications for any business aspiring to compete in a global marketplace for services. This email replies to the Federal Register September 19  Request for Comments and Notice of Public Hearing Concerning Market Access in the Doha Development Agenda Negotiations in the World Trade Organization (WTO) at  http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=02-23846-filed
 
Please find attached and also available on line http://www.gtwassociates.com/alerts/submitted.doc  a paper  "International Standards in your Future."  The paper presents the legacy and  precedent – setting impact of the ISO 9000 quality system standard for global product markets. The paper  documents the parallel approach  taken within the WTO  Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade and the General Agreement on Trade in Services that could  convey similar market power to  international standards relevant to “services”   That countries and regional economies develop and promote strategic standards initiatives on behalf of local suppliers is demonstrated through  regulatory and research activities of the European Commission.
 
GTW Associates completed an assignment Service Standardization in the United States  Overview of current activities and issues [1] in April 2002 for the German National Standards Organization DIN [2].  The GTW project in turn contributed to a project Service-Standards for Global Markets  [3] coordinated by DIN and funded by the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research.
 
One of the findings  in the GTW report delivered to DIN  addressed "What are Problems Impacting Service Standards in the USA?"  The two most strategic conclusions were:
 
    The Decentralized Sector-specific US approach to standards is both a         Strength and Weakness. The US approach distributes activity close to experts and local conditions… but decentralization by topic and by locality presents coordination challenges and multiple solutions, often local rather than national requirements

 

    There are increasing numbers of cross sectoral standards such as for privacy, dispute settlement, security, corporate ethics and social accountability
 
Two such cross sectoral standards initiatives which in my opinion have strategic implications for US globally oriented services businesses are new projects of  International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for  " Market-based Codes of Conduct" and  "External Customer dispute resolution systems"
 
On September 30 in Berlin, GTW Associates presented a paper "Overview of US services Standards" at a conference "Service Standards for Global Markets" organized by the DIN  (see program at http://www.service-standards.com/englishsite/servicestandards_events2002.pdf  ) The GTW power point presentation is available at http://gtwassociates.com/alerts/DIN.ppt 
 
I would be pleased to meet with any US interested public or private sector representatives who might be interested in these matters.

[1] Service Standardization in the United States  Overview of current activities and issues April, 2002 http://gtwassociates.com/alerts/servicesproject.html

 

[2] DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V. http://www2.din.de/index.php?lang=en

 

[3] Service-Standards for Global Markets   http://www.service-standards.com/  

 
Sincerely
 
 
 
George T. Willingmyre, P.E.
President
GTW Associates
1012 Parrs Ridge Drive
Spencerville, MD 20868  USA
301.421.4138  fax 301.421.0977
http://www.gtwassociates.com
 


[search] | [home] [issues & answers]

We welcome your comments and suggestions. © Copyright 1995-2000 GTW Associates.
This site developed and maintained by VisionFoundry, Ltd.